Hot?

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It’s ice lolly time!

Hot? Apparently, we will be this weekend. The sun is set to shine, and here is a recipe that might entertain your toddler in the kitchen for a few minutes, then keep them cool a few hours later.

  1. Get yourself some of these handy ice pop moulds (other types are available).
  2. You’ll need: a ripe mango or a pineapple, a banana (optional), a tin of coconut milk, a squeeze of lemon or lime and some maple syrup.
  3. With the help of your toddler, peel and prepare your fruit. Blend together your fruit, with a suitable amount of coconut milk (let’s say half a tin, but taste and see). You could add a squeeze of lemon or lime and a squirt of maple syrup to make it yummier still.
  4. Then with your toddler, fill your moulds with mixture and put them in the freezer.
  5. Make them in the morning, and they should be ready to eat in the afternoon.

Tip: when you get them out of the freezer, run them under a hot tap, so they’re not too icy and you can squeeze them out of the moulds.

We’ve had fun making and eating these. Hope you do too.

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‘Can I do making?’

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We made these!

My granny was a proper granny. She had the finest collection of hats known to humanity and a startling number of shoes accrued over seven decades or so.

By night, she wore plastic curlers in her hair and slept with a stick under her bed, ready to fight off assailants. By day, she sat in her rocking chair, knitting and watching black and white war films – that’s if she wasn’t gardening, decorating, cooking, baking, sewing, pressing flowers, making cards or entertaining her grandchildren with infinite patience.

I spent many happy Sunday afternoons perched on a stool by her side in the kitchen baking. We made butterfly cakes, coconut madeleines, melting moments, oat crunchies, eve puddings, apple tarts, jam tarts, toffee, jellies, doughnuts… I could go on, but my mouth’s watering already. My granny used heart-stopping quantities of golden syrup, treacle, sugar and Stork margarine, assuring me they were all good ingredients.

With such sunny memories, you’d have thought I’d have been delighted when my toddler started pulling up a stool of her own, standing alongside me in the kitchen and demanding to ‘do making’. But I’m ashamed to admit the opposite was true. Continue reading “‘Can I do making?’”